The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide

Carbon monoxide¬†(CO) is a toxic gas that’s produced by the incomplete burning of any fuel, including gas, fire, and wood. Many of the appliances in your home produce harmless amounts of CO. However, if these appliances aren’t properly maintained or ventilated it could lead to a hazardous buildup of CO. And, because the gas is colourless, odourless, and tasteless, it can be easy to remain unaware of potentially dangerous levels of CO in your home.

Symptoms of mild CO poisoning can include flu-like symptoms, such as headaches, nausea, and weakness. However, exposure to large amounts of CO far an extended period can be fatal. Follow these steps to prevent a buildup of CO in your home:

  • Install CO detectors on every level of your home. Also, never assume that your home’s smoke alarms can also detect CO.
  • Check your appliances every year to ensure that they’re in safe working order and have sufficient airflow around them. Appliances that emit CO include fireplaces, water heaters, portable generators, power tools, lawn equipment, and gas- or wood-burning cooking appliances.
  • Never leave a car or other motorized vehicle running in an attached garage, even if the garage door is open.
  • Never rely on ovens, gas grills or other appliances to heat your home.
  • Contact a specialist to ensure that your chimneys, vents, and flues are providing sufficient ventilation to your home.

For more information on protecting your home from CO and other dangers gases, such as radon and natural gas leaks, visit our website at www.scrivens.ca or call us at 613-236-9101.

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